The Hidden Worlds: Inside the album

“ … when I’m creating music, I mostly envision different worlds. Once you stick with astronomy and the mysteries of the universe, there’s no turning back, hence the track titles are all universe-related. I’m all about stargazing, what I imagine is what I create and through the process I’m feeling it. The album title says it all really …”

cover

“The Hidden Worlds” is the debut personal album of the Serbian producer Slobodan Oljaca, known by his recording alias Okee. An inertial and stellar navigation to distant constellations and planets, the album beautifully emulates premium atmospherics, creating a mood of existential uncertainty. Profoundly influenced by vintage science fiction films and the exceptional drum & bass sound of the 90s, “The Hidden Worlds” captures sense and sensibility as grandly as Okees’ musical icons, investing every glacial synth shimmer with a hope even solar  wind at the termination shock can’t kill.

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Tracks I Wish I’d Written (issue #12): Makoto & MC Conrad – Golden Girl

“… definitely there’s something about you…”

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Golden Girl (GLR066)

Throwback to the season 2003-04, a happy and eventful period of my life I reminisce about with bittersweet nostalgia. I was living in London at the time immersing myself in the city’s night life like there was no tomorrow, camouflaging the cultural shock of rubbing shoulders with my musical icons. The London drum & bass scene was flourishing, club nights talking place in abundance. From mid-week events like Fabio’s ‘Swerve’ Wednesdays at The End and ‘Movement’ Thursdays at Bar Rumba to the main Friday residencies like Fabric Room 2 label takeovers, Good Looking’s Progression Sessions’, Ram and Renegade Hardware at The End, to the ad hoc d&b parties at Jazz Café, Heaven, Ministry of Sound, Carling Academy, Cargo and Plastic People to Sunday evenings at Herbal with ‘Hospitality’ and Grooverider’s ‘Grace’. There must have been definitely many more I have forgotten to highlight as memories tend to blur after all these years, but there was always something happening to accommodate for every musical taste. It was evident, even then, that it was only a matter of time, before drum & bass would sell out big clubs and headline festivals across the world.

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Count To Ten: Drum & Bass Illustrations and Record Artwork (part 2)

What the sleeve notes never tell you

Mosaic

It’s been 16 months since the original post , which was meant to be a one-off feature; however I always felt that it’s been somehow incomplete. The constructive feedback I received, occasionally bordering on debate over a matter de facto subjective, convinced me to revisit the topic; paraphrasing Nick Hornby “a sneer at the bad choices, an understated but supportive raise of the eyebrow for the good ones”. So, instead of updating the list, I decided to compile a new one containing record artwork I had intentionally omitted for a variety of reasons, as well as couple of recent entries.

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On Reflection: Six Years Of Blogging

“What came first, the music or the obsession?”

GodIsNoLongerADj 6th year

This coming month is the sixth year anniversary since the blog went officially online. Three years ago I shared some thoughts here about how it all started, a retrospective account of the events that influenced the blog’s thematic basis, as well as a quick walk-through the blog’s various categories/series and a brief background story behind each one of them. A lot has changed since then, so I thought it would be apt to update regular and non-regular readers about the new direction, forthcoming features and what the future holds for this blog. Certain categories have completed their cycle, new have been added and some remain dormant until the right trigger or inspiration comes up.

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Tracks I Wish I’d Written (issue #11): MI5 – Experience

“… hearing my track loud on a sound system, watching people’s reactions. That’s all you need as a producer. That’s pure approval right there. People loving what you make; it ‘s mission accomplished …”

LSR020 - MI5 - Experience

MI5 – Experience (LSR020)

Throwback to 1995 for the 11th edition of the blog’s ‘Tracks I Wish I’d Written’ series. The artist name might not ring a bell at first glance; however behind this one-off recording guise has been one of the most influential and celebrated drum & bass producers of the mid-90s DJ Crystl. Combining old-school hip-hop breakbeat mechanics with ethereal sci-fi soundscapes, his productions have been paramount to the flourishing of ambient jungle. With a cinematic approach, collating and transcending contradictions – en vogue yet timeless, benign yet sinister, nuanced yet evident – Crystl has envisioned the soundtrack of imaginary film scenes.

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Electronic Reveries

Happy New Year everybody! For the first post of 2018, I have compiled a continuous playlist with some of my favourite electronic tracks from the last few years; essentially music I’ve been listening to, when I am not listening to drum & bass. Although this is clearly a drum & bass-oriented blog, regular readers must have spotted my affinity for ambient, film scores and modern electronica. I have contemplated the expansion of the blog’s scope quite often, however I eventually decided to publish non-drum & bass content only sporadically for the time being, as it seems impossible to stay up-to-date with more than one electronic music genre in a consistent fashion these days.

Electronic Reveries

“The soundtrack of daydreaming, adding widescreen vistas and deep, saturated hues to the monochrome silence”

The playlist selection has been quite diverse. Blurring the lines between composition and improvisation, from spacey ambience and dystopian interludes, to avant-garde electronica and contemporary classical music, the common denominator encompasses musicality, sound aesthetics and subtle emotional gravity. Continue reading

Count To Ten: Cross-genre drum & bass remixes – part 2 (1997-99)

The second part of the blog’s mini-series covers the period 1997-99. What may have started timidly for artistic purposes or exclusive dj promotional use, by 1997 it became almost de rigueur for record labels to commission drum & bass versions for selected singles and various remix compilations. The niche underground genre infiltrated the mainstream and many d&b producers signed with major labels to curate collections or record personal albums. On reflection, it turned out to be a double-edged sword.

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On one hand, d&b found its well-deserved place on the electronic music map. Artists were finally rewarded and vindicated for their efforts and their work was introduced from a limited connoisseur circle to a wider audience, providing them with a vital and creative space for experimentation. Commercial success and critic appreciation motivated accomplished, as well as up-and-coming producers to master their craft, pushing the musical boundaries beyond genre confines. On the other hand, the roller coaster of media exposure, politics, cloudy distribution and licensing agreements, self-indulgence and the drama that inevitably occurs when money and temporary fame enter the equation, terminated careers and friendships untimely and ingloriously. Effectively, drum & bass re-entered a phase of introversion, darkness and belligerence marking the end of the romance. An injection of fresh air was desperately needed and a new breed of producers and record labels emerged to fill in the gap created by those who helped the scene flourish, but sadly realized that they no longer fitted in the d&b reality of the new millennium.

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