On The Outside, Looking In Vol. 1: Sicknote x Soul Beat Runner

Most of the blog’s features are thematically based on informal conversations with my guests. Although I often include verbatim excerpts, it’s been a long time since I posted an actual interview. This is the first installment of a new category introduced to replace one of the blog’s oldest series “Jump The Q”, which has unceremoniously completed its cycle. The “Jump The Q” questionnaire template was designed to be short and simple rather than thought-provoking; the general idea being to discover a few personal details about artists and djs (from their favourite drink to the worst live performance they’ve witnessed), whose music-related work I admire and respect.

The new category titled “On The Outside, Looking In” will encompass a broad and conceptual music-centered scope. The timeline is intentionally non-linear, jumping back and forth in times and places and the head-title is borrowed from the first Modern Urban Jazz release by Glider-State (Blame & Justice); a casual chat between friends and a retrospective sneak view into old photo albums, collections, musical diaries, hazy memories and internal monologues.

Sicknote x SBR

Sicknote x Soul Beat Runner

The new series kicks off with two guests, who share common musical taste, vision and aesthetics, dating back to the early days of drum & bass. Really intrigued to find out more about their views, perspective and insight, I am very happy to present Lewis ‘Sicknote’ and Michael ‘Soul Beat Runner’ (SBR) discussing all things music.

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Count To Ten: Cross-genre drum & bass remixes – part 2 (1997-99)

The second part of the blog’s mini-series covers the period 1997-99. What may have started timidly for artistic purposes or exclusive dj promotional use, by 1997 it became almost de rigueur for record labels to commission drum & bass versions for selected singles and various remix compilations. The niche underground genre infiltrated the mainstream and many d&b producers signed with major labels to curate collections or record personal albums. On reflection, it turned out to be a double-edged sword.

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On one hand, d&b found its well-deserved place on the electronic music map. Artists were finally rewarded and vindicated for their efforts and their work was introduced from a limited connoisseur circle to a wider audience, providing them with a vital and creative space for experimentation. Commercial success and critic appreciation motivated accomplished, as well as up-and-coming producers to master their craft, pushing the musical boundaries beyond genre confines. On the other hand, the roller coaster of media exposure, politics, cloudy distribution and licensing agreements, self-indulgence and the drama that inevitably occurs when money and temporary fame enter the equation, terminated careers and friendships untimely and ingloriously. Effectively, drum & bass re-entered a phase of introversion, darkness and belligerence marking the end of the romance. An injection of fresh air was desperately needed and a new breed of producers and record labels emerged to fill in the gap created by those who helped the scene flourish, but sadly realized that they no longer fitted in the d&b reality of the new millennium.

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All Hidden Agenda mix by Law

My friend Ricky Law @ Drumtrip UK, recorded a fine mix paying tribute to one of my all-time favourite artists Hidden Agenda, featuring a plethora of classics, as well as underrated gems like “Get Carter”, “Sirens” and “The Wall With Paintings” remixes.

Biography, discography highlights, reviews and all things Hidden Agenda are available in the blog’s archive here

You may read the original post on Drumtrip here

An older Q&A with Law, from the blog’s archives, is available here

Digital Jumps The Q

“I don’t feel I was trying to be anyone else, I was drawing from my influences when I was younger, a bit of reggae, hip-hop … It was coming straight from the heart and I think that’s important” – Digital on his first production steps calling for individuality – Red Bull Music Academy, Rome, 2004

Digital

The next international guest of the blog’s “Jump the Q” series is Digital; one of the most prolific, influential, consistent and widely respected drum & bass artists. Two decades after his inaugural solo release, with an enviable and extensive back catalogue under his belt, as well as a plethora of classics for the genre’s most prestigious record labels, Digital celebrates the 20 years milestone of his recording career with the re-launch of his own imprint Function Records.

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Whatever happened to … Hidden Agenda?

This is the first installment (an updated version in terms of content and structure) of the blog’s Whatever happened to …? article series, inspired by the eponymous Hidden Agenda album, released on the Swiss label Straight Ahead in 2000.

Hidden Agenda

Hidden Agenda

Intro:

“They’re talented boys! Fusing old-skool jazz, with a touch of the Miles stylez. They deal with a genre which was previously missing from Metalheadz. Our Urban Break-beat representatives up north”. – Goldie on Hidden Agenda

“Metalheadz gives us the freedom to try out new things and to develop our music without the usual constraints alongside like-minded artists”. – Hidden Agenda

(Notes taken from the inner sleeve of the first Platinum Breakz volume, released in 1996)

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Whatever happened to … Foul Play?

Foul Play

Foul Play

Intro:

The seventh installment of the “Whatever happened to …?” series is dedicated to Foul Play; a pioneering, genre-defining and innovative electronic music act, heralding the transition from hardcore breakbeat to jungle/drum and bass. Being active almost throughout the 90s (the band’s synthesis changed twice during its activity, due to unforeseen circumstances) constantly re-inventing themselves, with dexterous, second-to-none programming and sample manipulation, their illustrious productions have marked indelibly the UK underground music map.

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Count To Ten: Nookie

Nookie

Undoubtedly one of the leading lights in the Drum & Bass scene, Nookie (aka Cloud 9, Freddy Fudpukker, Main Attraction, Private Productions, Second Vision, Traces Of Guilt and Windy Milla) is London Herts dj, producer, artist and remixer Gavin Cheung.

Nookie is a true veteran of the drum & bass scene, whilst at the same time one of its most forward thinking protagonists. With dozens of releases on key labels such as Reinforced, Moving Shadow, Labello Blanco, Penny Black, Good Looking and his own Strictly Digital and Phuzion, almost a hundred remixes and five albums under his belt, Nookie has been one of the most prolific drum and bass producers keeping a perfect balance between quality and quantity.

An early fan of hip-hop and electro, Gavin Cheung was a member of a break-dance crew that also recorded several sessions during the mid-’80s. After studying for several years, he began working in a record store around the time of the acid-house explosion of the late ’80s. Debuting on wax with a ragga/hip-hop remix of Ninjaman’s “Zig It Up” in 1990, Cheung was a proper player in Britain’s growing hardcore techno scene of the early ’90s. Continue reading