Savage Times: Inside Modern Urban Jazz

“… when I refer to the music now as d&b, I never really considered it much then. I know that may sound strange, but I think we always operated as outsiders; I personally always felt on the outside looking in, which is why our Glider-State track was called so…”

“… I hadn’t done anything on Modern Urban Jazz since the ‘Emotions With Intellect’ LP, so to keep the ethos going, we decided that this would be an ideal collaboration by using the Modern Urban Jazz tag on the Creative Wax label. I don’t think either of our labels had been ones to follow trends and certainly at the time we were ripe for a more experimental sound…” 

Modern Urban Jazz

Modern Urban Jazz front cover (CWLP001, 1997)

Modern Urban Jazz 01 is a seminal compilation album, curated by Tony Justice Bowes and published by Creative Wax. Celebrating the 20th anniversary of the official release, this is a retrospective account of the series of events that culminated in the realization of a brilliant project, which transcends genres and time. Titled after Justice’s eponymous record label, the compilation shares similar aesthetics and musical direction. An amalgamation of sounds with allusions to musique concrete; jazz noir, hip hop, funk, techno and electro instilled into drum & bass, with all contributing artists showcasing their musical backgrounds and creative influences, free of formulas, dancefloor reaction and genre constraints. Walking down a long, nostalgic and captivating trip down memory lane, this is a colourful and emotionally charged narrative, through the protagonists’ looking glass, filled with fond and distant memories that capture vividly the atmosphere of the mid-90s drum & bass scene.

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On Reflection: Three Years Of Blogging

“A passion for music that gradually escalated over time into a controlled obsession”

GodIsNoLongerADj

It has been three years since this blog went online, although its conception goes further back, so I eventually decided it’s about time I shared some thoughts about how it all started, as well as provide a retrospective account of the events that influenced the blog’s thematic basis. At the end of the feature, there is a quick walk-through the blog’s various categories/series and a brief background story behind each one of them.

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Tune Of The Day – Review for drumtrip.co.uk

This is the first installment of the new synergy between this blog and the oldschool specialists at drumtrip.co.uk. Celebrating the new collaboration and affiliation, i have contributed a review of the track Final Conflict (Tango remix) by The Committee (DJ Pulse & Tango); one of the finest pieces of the Creative Wax back catalogue. Falling under the website’s category Tune Of The Day, the original post can be found here.

There will be further contributions to Drumtrip in the near future, so watch this space …

 

Whatever happened to … Foul Play?

Foul Play

Foul Play

Intro:

The seventh installment of the “Whatever happened to …?” series is dedicated to Foul Play; a pioneering, genre-defining and innovative electronic music act, heralding the transition from hardcore breakbeat to jungle/drum and bass. Being active almost throughout the 90s (the band’s synthesis changed twice during its activity, due to unforeseen circumstances) constantly re-inventing themselves, with dexterous, second-to-none programming and sample manipulation, their illustrious productions have marked indelibly the UK underground music map.

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Whatever happened to … Endemic Void?

“Ennio Morricone meeting Isaac Hayes in a full-on jungle vibe, Endemic Void  pushes the limits of time-stretchology with this deep, cinematic, frontline  fanfare. Rich, vibrant and all-encompassing” –   (Melody Maker, 1995) 

Endemic Void

Endemic Void

The fourth installment of the series is dedicated to one of the unsung heroes of the golden era of drum and bass Danny Coffey (aka Basic One, Blades, Tertius, Endemic Void, Slipstream and Strictly Rockers).

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Whatever happened to … Partisan Recordings?

The third installment of the series is dedicated to the short-lived but highly influential label Partisan Recordings, established as one of the most innovative outlets of cutting-edge drum and bass in the late 90s. The purpose of this article is to shed light on the high impact of the label on the drum and bass landscape of the late 90s, having been the creative home of some of the most prominent drum and bass artists of that time.

Partisan Logo 1

Partisan Recordings

History and label set-up

In the late summer of 1997 and after legal wrangling with Moving Shadow’s head honcho, five key members of the Moving Shadow managing staff resigned from their posts, namely: Caroline Butler (Label Manager at Moving Shadow Records), Sean O’Keeffe (aka Deep Blue and Art Director at Moving Shadow also), Simon Colebrooke (of 2 Bad Mice and A&R Director – responsible for the recruitment of all artists), Paul Rhodes (of 2 Bad Mice also – Label Assistant) and Gavin Newman (Label Assistant); essentially the entire staff aside from Rob Playford.

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Whatever happened to … Creative Wax?

The second installment of the series is dedicated to one of the most influential labels of the jungle/drum and bass scene. From the early hardcore days to the second half of the 90s, Creative Wax fostered an enviable stable of producers and artists, releasing a plethora of classics during its activity. The mix-up of Detroit techno influences and later jazz established Creative Wax as one of the most innovative outlets of quality music in the drum and bass scene of the 90’s. The purpose of this article is to shed light on the massive contribution of Creative Wax to the ever-changing drum and bass landscape, having been the point of reference and an indelible influence to the next generation of jungle/dnb artists.

Creative Wax logo

Creative Wax

Creative Wax was founded in 1992 by Ashley Brown aka DJ Pulse (1/3 of Dance Conspiracy and Jazz Cartel) and Jack Horner (Bad Influence). The label roster includes some of the biggest names in engineering and production of that time, collaborating frequently with each other under various monikers. Early releases have been predominantly by label owner Pulse alongside Wax Doctor, with Alex Reece and Professor Stretch (Underwolves) taking care of the engineering duties. The label also had various collaborations by Alex Reece and Wax Doctor under names such as Fallen Angels and Unit 1. Other notable names in the camp were The Underwolves, who went on to record for Ross Allen’s Island Records imprint Blue and Compost Records, Tango, who also recorded with Pulse on the legendary Moving Shadow, Justice another Moving Shadow artist, who now runs his own Modern Urban Jazz label and finally Digital (a well established artist from the Metalheadz and Timeless Recordings collective among others). Continue reading