Law (drumtrip.co.uk) Jumps The Q

A mini-interview with 22 short questions (some personal, some tricky) looking for equally short answers, addressed to artists, producers, promoters, djs, friends and affiliates of the blog in general.

The next international guest featuring in the Jump The Q series of the blog is Dj Law; an old school specialist, the mastermind and curator of drumtrip.co.uk, sharing some personal trivia with the blog. A short bio, information about Drumtrip and respective links can be found below the Q&A.

Drumtrip

Drumtrip

Law Jumps The Q

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Whatever happened to … Foul Play?

Foul Play

Foul Play

Intro:

The seventh installment of the “Whatever happened to …?” series is dedicated to Foul Play; a pioneering, genre-defining and innovative electronic music act, heralding the transition from hardcore breakbeat to jungle/drum and bass. Being active almost throughout the 90s (the band’s synthesis changed twice during its activity, due to unforeseen circumstances) constantly re-inventing themselves, with dexterous, second-to-none programming and sample manipulation, their illustrious productions have marked indelibly the UK underground music map.

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Harris (Funxion, I Got Bass) Jumps the Q

A mini-interview with 22 short questions (some personal, some tricky) looking for equally short answers, addressed to artists, producers, promoters, djs, friends and affiliates of the blog in general.

Today’s guest is one of the original Greek bass soldiers, active for more than two decades in the domestic and international proceedings, sharing some personal trivia with the blog. A short bio and relative links can be found below the Q&A.

 Harris (Funxion, I Got Bass) Jumps the Q
Harris Funxion

Harris Funxion

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Whatever happened to … Creative Wax?

The second installment of the series is dedicated to one of the most influential labels of the jungle/drum and bass scene. From the early hardcore days to the second half of the 90s, Creative Wax fostered an enviable stable of producers and artists, releasing a plethora of classics during its activity. The mix-up of Detroit techno influences and later jazz established Creative Wax as one of the most innovative outlets of quality music in the drum and bass scene of the 90’s. The purpose of this article is to shed light on the massive contribution of Creative Wax to the ever-changing drum and bass landscape, having been the point of reference and an indelible influence to the next generation of jungle/dnb artists.

Creative Wax logo

Creative Wax

Creative Wax was founded in 1992 by Ashley Brown aka DJ Pulse (1/3 of Dance Conspiracy and Jazz Cartel) and Jack Horner (Bad Influence). The label roster includes some of the biggest names in engineering and production of that time, collaborating frequently with each other under various monikers. Early releases have been predominantly by label owner Pulse alongside Wax Doctor, with Alex Reece and Professor Stretch (Underwolves) taking care of the engineering duties. The label also had various collaborations by Alex Reece and Wax Doctor under names such as Fallen Angels and Unit 1. Other notable names in the camp were The Underwolves, who went on to record for Ross Allen’s Island Records imprint Blue and Compost Records, Tango, who also recorded with Pulse on the legendary Moving Shadow, Justice another Moving Shadow artist, who now runs his own Modern Urban Jazz label and finally Digital (a well established artist from the Metalheadz and Timeless Recordings collective among others). Continue reading

Logical Progression Global Access @ Melkweg, Amsterdam, 18 May, 2012

Good Looking records celebrated the 17th anniversary of the Logical Progression initiative on May 18, 2012 in Amsterdam. It was an impeccable production with special guests for the night the mighty Fabio, EZ Rollers and DJ Marky alongside the one and only LTJ Bukem, hosted by MCs Conrad, Stamina and Moose. It has been a long trip down memory lane; a parade of countless classics from the back catalogues of all the labels that were prominent in the game throughout the second half of the 90’s (Good Looking, Metalheadz, Moving Shadow, Timeless, Skanna, Dee Jay Recordings, Creative Source, Creative Wax just to name a few…)

It is very hard to describe the feelings and the memories unleashed during that night making it almost a religious experience for the lucky attendants. I apologize in advance for the poor quality of my videos attached, but let them give a brief, but in no way conclusive, review of what happened that night.

Logical Progression 17th anniversary poster

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Whatever happened to …?

It‘s been almost two decades since the birth and evolution of the jungle/drum and bass music (will be referred to as jdnb onwards). Many artists and labels have marked indelibly the development of this musical genre with their work, vision and ethos, establishing jdnb as a dynamic and pioneering movement in the electronic dance music culture.  At first underground and accessible to the chosen few, jdnb has become slowly but surely a prominent player in the urban underground music map. No matter how different the styles and the musical taste of their champions, the evolution of this music has been very interesting to watch. Inevitably, there have been ambiguous eras. The effort, on behalf of the producers, to re-vitalize people’s interest, re-invent themselves or develop a certain identity has led to the generation of many sub-genres; the results however, after 20 years or so, have been more than satisfying. Recently, a dnb track hit no1 in the UK chart, an achievement rather unimaginable back in the day.

The world doesn’t stop turning, whatever you heard, neither do life and music. Labels and artists have come and gone, which is quite normal during a period spanning almost 20 years. Priorities change, circumstances demand a re-target of focus and the financial factor has been always crucial in the music industry. The main purpose of this article series is to shed light on the contribution of certain artists who have left the scene and of various labels that are now defunct. The reasons of their activity suspension are many and beyond the purpose of this series. It is impossible to include every label and artist, no matter how large or small their contribution, so in all fairness the selection is solely based on my taste, knowledge and sympathy.

Part 1 coming up. Whatever happened to … Hidden Agenda?

Memoirs Of a Vinyl Junkie – part 2

Vinyl

Tuesday morning, October 1993

09:50

He is staring anxiously at the classroom clock counting the nanoseconds. It’s almost 10 and in about an hour or so the boxes with the new releases at the record store downtown are bound to open. There is no way he can make it before 2, unless he skips the last hour at school. He already knows that’s exactly what he is going to do.
The guy behind the counter had promised him that the tunes he was searching for the last weeks would be included in those boxes. It was not the first time the guy made such a promise just to get rid of him, but it didn’t worth the risk. He had to be there in person; phone-calls were never effective. Everybody, who has been at a record store more than twice, can tell a story about a record in a shelf already reserved for a radio producer, a dj or a mate of the store owner.
His impatience was intensified by the fact that every Tuesday morning all the big dogs of the scene would be there. He was a bit intimidated by them and the fact that they always had priority over him to listen to the tunes in the private booth was a bit frustrating. He could not spend as much as they did, as his only resource was his weekly allowance, so their priority status, however irritating it was, actually made sense.

13:10

He enters the record store which is already packed and many familiar faces are already searching the shelves and discussing with the guys behind the counter. There is a queue on the decks where one can hear a preview of a record before he can buy it. He heads directly to the jungle/breakbeat section. He knows that the possibility to find on the shelves the records he was looking for is much greater than to find them behind the counter. He’s right! Two records of the list are already there along with a couple of promos he should definitely check out. He picks them all up and visits the other sections waiting for a slot in the private booth. Continue reading