Electronic Reveries

Happy New Year everybody! For the first post of 2018, I have compiled a continuous playlist with some of my favourite electronic tracks from the last few years; essentially music I’ve been listening to, when I am not listening to drum & bass. Although this is clearly a drum & bass-oriented blog, regular readers must have spotted my affinity for ambient, film scores and modern electronica. I have contemplated the expansion of the blog’s scope quite often, however I eventually decided to publish non-drum & bass content only sporadically for the time being, as it seems impossible to stay up-to-date with more than one electronic music genre in a consistent fashion these days.

Electronic Reveries

“The soundtrack of daydreaming, adding widescreen vistas and deep, saturated hues to the monochrome silence”

The playlist selection has been quite diverse. Blurring the lines between composition and improvisation, from spacey ambience and dystopian interludes, to avant-garde electronica and contemporary classical music, the common denominator encompasses musicality, sound aesthetics and subtle emotional gravity. Continue reading

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Count To Ten: Cross-genre drum & bass remixes – part 1 (1995-96)

This is the first part of a mini-series focusing on cross-genre drum & bass remixes; from subtle re-interpretations to complete re-constructions. The burgeoning d&b popularity in the mid-90s attracted media attention and interest from independent, as well as major record labels, which commissioned d&b remixes for their artists across the music spectrum; from post-punk and progressive rock, to indie-pop and acid jazz. The syncopated, sample-based drum & bass template accommodated for experimentation and fostered an adventurous environment to introduce innovative production techniques and sonic landscapes.

Mosaic

In hindsight, efficient promotional, publishing, licensing and distribution models exposed UK drum & bass to the large emerging markets of Japan and USA and the genre has been effectively embraced by a wider audience. Many artists seized the opportunity to explore new musical paths. However, what started with bona fide artistic and creative intentions came with a price. In certain cases, it was no more than a sly scheme to cash in on the niche genre emerging from the underground. As a counter-measure, a few years later, the d&b scene retreated back to introversion, inaccessibility and darkness with many struggling to find their place in the new bleak reality (more on part 2).

Continue reading